Precarious Work

When an employer won't allow a worker more than 25 hours a week but requires that worker to be available for work 7 days a week, people become little more than commodities on the open market of Precarious Employment. Lately I have made an effort to talk with folks that work at places like Shopper's … Continue reading Precarious Work

Trends Leaders Cannot Ignore

In September I am doing six workshops at Tamarack's Community Change Institute. One of the workshops is: Ten Trends Leaders Cannot Ignore. I am gathering data right now, investigating trends identified by others; there are so many trends we have to pay attention to that I am not yet certain of the ten I will showcase. … Continue reading Trends Leaders Cannot Ignore

Income Trends and Canadian Consumer Debt

Over the past 15 years Canadian consumer debt has risen dramatically.  Since 2000, the percentage of Canadian debt in relationship to disposable income has risen from 110% of income to about 165%. The change in debt to income ratio represents a 12 year increase of 50%. The old adage about “people should live within their … Continue reading Income Trends and Canadian Consumer Debt

Some Questions: Minimum and Living Wage

Some short snippets to ponder: None of the government contracts my organization currently has provide sufficient monies to provide my staff with an RSSP or pension plan. Funny though that every one we deal with about our government contracts is paid more than my staff and have a pension plan. Why is that? I wonder … Continue reading Some Questions: Minimum and Living Wage

Higher Minimum Wage: More Gain than Pain?

The debate about having a living wage has many voices. A colleague recently shared a public letter that a chef wrote to the Premier, expressing how a minimum wage of $15.00 per hour would jeopardize his plans to open a restaurant. He makes many excellent points and does so in clear and respectful language. My … Continue reading Higher Minimum Wage: More Gain than Pain?

What does “living” mean in a Living Wage?

The Edmonton Social Planning Council just published research that indicates the living wage in Edmonton should be $17.36 per hour for a two-parent family with young children and both parents working 35 hours per week. The monthly budget prepared for this sample family assumes both workers are making $17.36 per hour. Before going further, setting a living … Continue reading What does “living” mean in a Living Wage?

Guaranteed Minimum Annual Income in Alberta?

The Mayors of Edmonton and Calgary are talking about it (read). Many agree with them and I am one; it's worth a good look. In fact, I suggest that a guaranteed annual income be considered as a foundational strategy to lift hundreds of thousands of people out of poverty. Whether or not it will work … Continue reading Guaranteed Minimum Annual Income in Alberta?